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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

General USAMMA info


What does USAMMA do?

USAMMA's mission is to develop, tailor, deliver, and sustain medical materiel capabilities and data in order to build and enable health readiness. Our core competencies are focused on equipping and sustaining the medical force. We do this by forecasting and executing a variety of medical materiel readiness missions. We also provide a full-range of medical materiel solutions and support; perform medical set assembly functions and materiel delivery or fielding for the operating and generating forces worldwide; provide acquisition project management and related force management expertise as the materiel developer for commercial and non-developmental items; manage medical cataloging and sourcing solutions for medical materiel; provide integrated acquisition logistics including maintenance and medical materiel life cycle management in support of operating and generating forces; and we centrally manage medical Army Prepositioned Stocks and The Surgeon General's contingency program and other readiness support programs designed for all Army components during unified land operations. Additionally, we provide National Maintenance Program expertise and sustainment maintenance functions; deploy the Medical Logistics Support Team (MLST) in support of theater opening; and deploy the Forward Repair Activity-Medical (FRA-M) team in order to provide expert medical maintainer support as far forward as possible.

Where does USAMMA fit in the Army organization?

USAMMA is a subordinate organization of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). USAMRMC is a major subordinate command of Army Medicine. USAMRMC is also headquartered at Fort Detrick, Maryland, and supports not only USAMMA but also a variety of subordinate commands located throughout the world. Six USAMRMC medical research laboratories and institutes perform the core science and technology (S&T) research to develop medical solutions. These laboratories specialize in various areas of biomedical research, including infectious diseases, combat casualty care, operational medicine, clinical and rehabilitative medicine, chemical and biological defense, combat dentistry, and laser effects. Five other USAMRMC subordinate commands, including USAMMA, perform medical materiel advanced development, strategic and operational medical logistics, and contracting, to complete the lifecycle management of medical materiel.

Where is USAMMA located?

USAMMA operates worldwide. USAMMA is headquartered at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland (learn more about Fort Detrick at: http://www.detrick.army.mil/). USAMMA also has three stateside medical maintenance depots located at Tobyhanna, PA; Hill Air Force Base, UT; and San Joaquin, CA. USAMMA also centrally manages the Medical Materiel Readiness Program, which maintains assets at Sierra Army Depot in Herlong, CA. Additionally, USAMMA maintains pre-positioned materiel and contingency stocks afloat and in strategic locations in Europe and Asia.

Who works at USAMMA?

USAMMA has almost 500 employees, including military, civilians, contractors and foreign nationals. We have a great mix of expertise, including logisticians, biomedical maintenance equipment specialists, cybersecurity and web developers, engineers, project managers, and support personnel.

Is USAMMA's Headquarters at Fort Detrick a giant warehouse or depot?

No, but we have heard this is a common assumption given our mission. In fact, the USAMMA Headquarters at Fort Detrick Maryland, is nested inside the Defense Medical Logistics Center (a 3-story office building), alongside the Navy, Air Force and Defense Health Agency. If you want to see a giant warehouse with lots of medical materiel, you should visit one of our stateside depots!

Where can I learn more about USAMMA successes?

Check out our news page to read about more our most recent successes.

How do I contact USAMMA?

Visit our contacts page.

Acquisition and Advanced Development

I am a vendor and I have a product(s) that I believe could benefit the military. How can I show my product(s) to the military?

There are a variety of ways to tell us about your product, including:

  1. Use the New Products and Ideas portal.
  2. Sign up for an upcoming Vendor Day at Fort Detrick.
  3. Consider participating in the annual Military Medical Partnerships Day.

How can I see what you are already working on?
USAMMA is a subordinate organization of the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), the Army's main medical materiel developer. Check out the USAMRMC's Advanced Development Product book. While this book is not a comprehensive list of every project, it does provide a robust list of past and present efforts.

To learn more about USAMMA's acqusition Project Management Offices, visit our Acquisition page.

Medical Maintenance

How can I learn more about USAMMA's medical maintenance depots?

USAMMA operations include three stateside depots that serve as distinct Centers of Excellence (COE):

  • Medical Maintenance Division (MMOD)-Tobyhanna (Penn.): COE for audiometer calibration, optical equipment, dental hand-piece rebuild, Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) Direct Exchange (DX) program, and Table of Organization and Equipment (TOE) lab equipment.
  • MMOD-Hill (Utah): COE for anesthesia, pulmonary, and field medical equipment.
  • Defense Distribution Center San Joaquin (Calif.): COE for medical imaging equipment, special purpose test, measurement & diagnostics equipment (TMDE-SP), the certified X-ray tube head rebuild program, and the Army Medicine X-ray acceptance program.

Visit our Medical Matintenance section to learn more about ourdepots and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).

National Maintenance Program

How can I learn more about the NMP?
Visit the NMP webpage at http://amedmrmcc2383:8008/Pages/M3D_NMP.aspx

Test, Measurement, and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE)

Are there any TMDE types exempt from the TMDE acquisition process?

Yes, Army Regulation 750-43 (Chapter 4) includes a comprehensive list of Test, Measurement, and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) exempt from acquisition approval.

Is there a difference between TDA & TOE units when it comes to purchasing non-standard TMDE?

Table of Distribution and Allowances (TDA) units are not restricted from purchasing non-standard TMDE as long as there is sufficient funding for TMDE support and calibration; units are strongly encouraged to base TMDE purchases on Preferred Items List (PIL) recommendations (See paragraph 3). Table of Organization and Equipment (TOE) units have limited funds to purchase and support additional TMDE (standard/non-standard) outside of normal inventory provisions. The TMDE request package will include a justification memo for submission when a sufficient budgetary amount has been authorized by the requesting command.

What is a PIL and how does it apply to me?

TMDE-GP - The PIL for medical TMDE-General Purpose (GP) includes items determined by the Program Director (PD), TMDE as acceptable for Army use; these items are considered logistically available and supportable. Any medical maintainer planning to purchase a specific type of TMDE-GP should first consult the PIL to verify its sustainability within the Army Medical Department (AMEDD). For specific information on TMDE-GP, visit our Medical Maintenance section.

What is considered a non-standard TMDE?

To be considered non-standard TMDE, the item must meet one or more of the following conditions: TMDE does not have an assigned National Stock Number (NSN). TMDE does not have a Line Item Number (LIN). Note: For TOE units, TMDE is considered non-standard when it is not authorized for inventory.

How do I turn in old TMDE if it's on the TOE and has been replaced with modern equipment?

Notify your Property Book Officer (PBO) about obsolete equipment before turning it in to the Defense Reutilization Management Office DRMO or before shipping it to any Army medical maintenance depot for disposal (if the DRMO is not accessible).

I have a problem with my TMDE safety/maintenance. Who do I report it to and how?

Contact your command TMDE Coordinator and have the device sent out for repair and/or calibration.

I have turned in obsolete or damaged TMDE to the DRMO; do I need to report anything back to USAMMA?

No, but make sure your PBO is aware that the TMDE has been turned in to the DRMO and that the change has been updated in your command's property management databases.

I found non-standard TMDE in my workplace; what do I do with it?

Non-essential TMDE - Send non-standard TMDE that is no longer essential to the DRMO. Essential TMDE - Verify that the TMDE calibration sticker is current; calibrate the device if the sticker has expired. Confirm with your PBO that the device is documented in the unit's inventory. 

TEWLS

Where do I find TEWLS resources, including training?

Visit our Business Support Office page.

Logistics Training

Does USAMMA have medical logistics training?

Yes. USAMMA manages the Medical Logistics Management Internship Program (MLMIP).

Materiel Fielding

My unit is scheduled for a USAMMA Materiel Fielding. What should we do?

USAMMA provides medical logistics support and solutions across the full spectrum of military health care worldwide. A key part of the USAMMA team is five regionally located medical liaison officers (LNOs). The LNOs coordinate with commands to make logistics assessments, based on historical trends and current requirements, in order to ensure medical readiness down to the unit level. The LNOs also provide before, during, and after deployment support for all units, including the Reserves and National Guard, with medical assets. To learn more about the LNO program and to find your regional LNO, visit our LNO webpage.

 My unit is scheduled for a USAMMA Materiel Fielding. How can I view the USAMMA field schedule?

The USAMMA fielding schedule is considered an internal working document due to the frequent changes and the need to safeguard unit specific information. For specific questions, please reach out to the USAMMA Operations by emailing: usarmy.detrick.medcom-usamma.mbx.ops-center@mail.mil 

MES, MMS and UAs

How do I find a component listing for Medical Equipment Set (MES), Medical Materiel Sets (MMS), or Unit Assemblages (UA)?

The USAMMA website provides several automated tools giving detailed component listing reports. These component listing provide both Hospital (Level III) and Non-Hospital (Level I & II) UA reports. To research Unit Assemblages (UA) the UA database provides listings for multiple years under the same Line Item Number (LIN). To research specific medical equipment items MEDSILS provides a database that cross-references key UA component materiel data. Both databases have on-line tutorials.

I have excess Medical Equipment Sets (MESs), Medical Materiel Sets (MMSs), or excess non-expendable medical equipment. What do I do with it?

There are a host of governing references and regulations (AR 40-61, AR 710-2, DA PAM 710-2-1, DA PAM 710-2-2, TB MED 750-1, AR 725-50, AR 71-32, and others), but here is a summary.

a. First, any non-expendable medical equipment requires a Condition Code. Contact your supporting Installation Medical Supply Activity (IMSA), medical Supply Support Activity (SSA), or Medical Logistics unit to have a trained Biomedical Maintenance Repairer technically inspect and give the equipment a Condition Code (see TB MED 750-1, Operating Guide for Medical Equipment Maintenance). The Condition Code helps your higher headquarters and USAMMA decide whether to redistribute the equipment/medical set, turn it in to DRMO, or ship it to a depot for repair.

b. Report the excess to your headquarters. This gives your brigade, division, or Army Service Component Command (ASCC - previously known as Major Army Command (MACOM)) the opportunity to redistribute the equipment or medical set to a unit in their command that is authorized the item but is short. National Guard units report the excess through the National Guard Bureau, and Army Reserve units report excess through the Army Reserve Command.

c. There is an exception if your medical set or non-expendable medical equipment becomes excess because USAMMA fields your unit new equipment or sets. In that case, USAMMA will give you detailed disposition instructions (i.e., tell you what to do with the equipment or set) in the form of a Letter of Instruction (LOI) as part of the fielding process, without having to go through your Army Service Component Command (ASCC). You must still have a trained Biomedical Maintenance Repairer technically inspect and give the equipment a Condition Code.

d. Include the following information when reporting any excess sets or equipment to your higher command or to USAMMA.

  • Full unit name and point of contact information (phone (commercial & DSN), email, and mailing address)
  • Unit Department of Defense Activity Address Code (DODAAC) and Unit Identification Code (UIC)
  • National Stock Number (NSN)
  • If there is no NSN, include manufacturer, model, serial number, and Federal Supply Category (i.e., 6515, 6520, 6545, etc.), if known
  • Full nomenclature
  • Accounting Requirements Code (Expendable - X, Durable - D, Non-Expendable - N)
  • Quantity
  • Condition Code (A, B, F, or H)
  • Document Number
  • List and attach MES and MMS shortages

e. Do not include the following materiel in your request for disposition instructions.

  • Medical equipment possessing electrical characteristics unique to a command (e.g., 220 volts, 50 hertz (HZ));
  • Materiel with Condition Code "H" and no recoverability code -this materiel should be turned-in to DRMO;
  • Standard expendable or durable items with a line item extended value less than $500;
  • Items with expiration date less than 12 months;
  • Refrigerated and freezer items;
  • Non-standard items;
  • Compressed gas cylinders;
  • Medical Materiel with FSC 6505, 6508, or 6550.
  • Note 'R' and 'Q' items.
  • Hazardous Materials to include, but not limited to, Lab Reagents, X-Ray film, film developer, Radioactive materiel (see AR 385-11).
  • Medical books and scientific journals;
  • Aeromedical Evacuation Materiel or Patient Movement Items (PMI): This materiel could include ventilators, infusion pumps, vital signs monitors, suction apparatuses, litters and mattresses, pillows, blankets, litter straps, and patient restraints. These items should be retained in theater.

f. Based on the information you provide, USAMMA's Force Sustainment Directorate will send you disposition instructions detailing what you must do with the sets and equipment. Examples of disposition instructions include turn-in to DRMO, ship to a depot for refurbishment and reutilization, and transfer to another unit with a valid authorization for the materiel.

g. Do not requisition components to fill shortages in excess MESs that you are turning-in to DRMO. When transferring property, use a separate document number for each item that has a different Condition Code (A, B, F, or H). The losing unit provides the document number and their ASCC (or their Installation Transportation Office) provides the Transportation Advice Code (TAC) to ship the materiel to the gaining unit. If USMMA directs shipment to another unit, USAMMA will provide the TAC.for shipment.

I see there are new Unit Assemblage Listings for my Medical Equipment Sets (MESs). How can my unit get the latest and most modern MESs available?

a. Ensure you accurately report shortages in your Unit Status Report. Your higher headquarters up to FORSCOM and the Department of the Army need to know your equipment readiness. Your commander can subjectively downgrade your unit's readiness rating if he/she identifies a shortfall in clinical capability. Also, the Army mandates the use of the Army Equipment Common Operating Picture (ECOP), which is on the HQs Department of the Army SIPR site, to post MTOE shortages as well as Operational Needs Statements (ONSs).

b. If you are deploying and your sets have a clinical shortfall in LIN level medical equipment items (OPA), identify and communicate that shortfall through your chain of command to the USAMMA EOC. When USAMMA is notified and can verify the shortage or clinical weakness, USAMMA will fill the shortage or upgrade the clinical capability pending available stock and funding or advice on the best strategy to fill this need. It is the unit's responsibility to maintain and sustain their fielded medical Sets, Kits and Outfits (SKOs) until USAMMA is funded or programmed by DA to field the unit new SKOs or provide a sustainment package. This is normally done via line item requisition using your supporting IMSA or Medical SSA.

c. If you are not part of a modernization program or deploying, and still want to upgrade your sets, then your command can fund the modernization. This is done by coordinating the materiel required and then sending a Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) to pay for the materiel. USAMMA will use the MIPR to build new sets and field them to you. The point of contact for this unit funded upgrade is the Assembly Management Branch at Commercial 301-619-4390 or DSN 343-4390.

How do I make a recommendation to add, change or delete an item to a Unit Assemblage, Set, Kit or Outfit?

The USAMMA Materiel Acquisition Directorate works closely with the Directorate of Combat Development (DCDD) to facilitate additions, changes and updates to Unit Assemblages, Sets, Kits, and Outfits and is always open to suggestions and recommendations from the field. To recommend any additions or changes to set components, to include the Unit's Review process, you must submit a DA Form 2028, mail the Form, to include justification to:

Commander, AMEDD Center and School
ATTN: MCCS FCO-MM
1400 E. Grayson Street
Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6123
Commercial: (210) 221-1260
DSN: 471-1260

My unit is activating or has already activated. How will my unit get its authorized Medical Equipment Sets (MESs)?

Ensure you accurately report shortages in your Unit Status Report (USR) based on the appropriate authorization document. Your higher headquarters up to FORSCOM and the Department of the Army need to know your equipment readiness status. Also, the Army mandates the use of the Equipment Common Operating Picture (ECOP), which is on the HQ Department of the Army SIPR site, to post MTOE shortages as well as Operational Needs Statements (ONSs).

The Office of the Surgeon General (OTSG) will advise the Department of the Army on fielding priortization of your unit medical equipment in the Army Investment Strategy (AIS). After DA determination, OTSG will then direct USAMMA to execute fielding based on priority and available funding.

What is the UA review and approval process?

The medical sets are clinically reviewed based on a cyclic review schedule and sets are usually reviewed every 3 years. This schedule is developed by Directorate of Combat and Doctrine Development (DCDD) at AMEDD Center & School, Ft Sam Houston, TX, with input from USAMMA, according to the guidance of AR 40-60 and AR 71-32.

The Combat Developer (DCDD) identifies which sets will be reviewed and when.

A new NSN and a new UAC are assigned when the set is clinically reviewed and the nomenclature of the set should identify the year of the review.

When the set is reviewed by the panel at DCDD (USAMMA participates), the approval process is the responsibility of the Combat Developer. Any submitted DA Form 2028s recommending set changes are reviewed at this time (reference USAMMA FAQ 3 g). The approval may be immediate or it could take 9-10 months and the approval process may cross over into the next FY. A delay in the approval process can occur if DCDD determines a Form, Fit, and Function or Packed Verification of the new set needs to be done.

Once we do get the approval letter back from DCDD, the USAMMA Assembly Management Division personnel has 30 days to identify sourcing for the set components before the new version is published as an approved set and the new set with new UAC is ready for a build.

When should a unit change UA Codes?

A unit is only required to change to the new UA code and NSN if USAMMA upgrades them to the new version or if their Commander determines they have funding to upgrade themselves. Guidance is provided in AR 40-61, Chapter 10.

Who should be notified of a UA Code change by a Unit?

The USAMMA Fielding office should be contacted if a Unit changes a UA code. AR 40-61, Chapter 10, paragraph 10-4, advises that units are only required to maintain their sets based on the version of the sets they were fielded.

A Unit may update their sets to the next version published by USAMMA for the same LIN if they have funding.

The Unit will be deleted from the USAMMA's fielding schedule once USAMMA is notified by the Unit that the Unit has upgraded themselves.

When the unit upgrades to a new UAC, then they must maintain that version of the set based on the new components identified on the new set listing. Our USAMMA "Medical Unit Assemblages" portion of the homepage provides the different versions of the sets tied to the set LIN.

For example, a medical set may be archived because it is no longer being built and fielded but USAMMA provides the latest version of that set on the USAMMA website under "Medical Unit Assemblages". These component lists on the USAMMA website provide visibility of the older set versions for those Units still maintaining these NSNs.

If a unit has an older MES and would like to update it to a new one, is this possible? Or at least replace some of the Durable or Non-Expendable items within the MES, this is a major problem with most of the units since their budget is almost nothing to none and there is no way they can buy the latest using their own funding.

a. Ensure you accurately report shortages in your Unit Status Report. Your higher headquarters up to FORSCOM and the Department of the Army need to know your equipment readiness. Your commander can subjectively downgrade your unit's readiness rating if he/she identifies a shortfall in clinical capability. Also, the Army mandates the use of the Army Equipment Common Operating Picture (ECOP), which is on the HQs Department of the Army SIPR site, to post MTOE shortages as well as Operational Needs Statements (ONSs).

b. If you are deploying and your sets have a clinical shortfall in LIN level medical equipment items (OPA), identify and communicate that shortfall through your chain of command to the USAMMA EOC. When USAMMA is notified and can verify the shortage or clinical weakness, USAMMA will fill the shortage or upgrade the clinical capability pending available stock and funding or advise on the best strategy to fill this need. It is the unit's responsibility to maintain and sustain their fielded medical Sets, Kits and Outfits (SKOs) until USAMMA is funded or programmed by DA to field the unit new SKOs or provide a sustainment package. This is normally done via line item requisition using your supporting IMSA or Medical SSA.

c. If you are not part of a modernization program or deploying, and still want to upgrade your sets, then your command can fund the modernization. This is done by coordinating the materiel required and then sending a Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) to pay for the materiel. USAMMA will use the MIPR to build new sets and field them to you. The point of contact for this unit funded upgrade is the Assembly Management Branch at Commercial 301-619-4390 or DSN 343-4390.

Is there someone in USAMMA that specifically handles Preventive Medicine Units MESs?

a. The medical sets are clinically reviewed based on a cyclic review schedule and sets are usually reviewed every 3 years. This schedule is developed by the Directorate of Combat and Doctrine Development (DCDD) at AMEDD Center & School, Ft Sam Houston, TX, with input from USAMMA, according to the guidance of AR 40-60 and AR 71-32.

b. The Combat Developer (DCDD) identifies which sets will be reviewed and when.

c. A new NSN and a new UAC are assigned when the set is clinically reviewed and the nomenclature of the set should identify the year of the review.

d. When the set is reviewed by the panel at DCDD (USAMMA participates), the approval process is the responsibility of the Combat Developer. Any submitted DA Form 2028s recommending set changes are reviewed at this time. The approval may be immediate or it could take 9-10 months and the approval process may cross over into the next FY. A delay in the approval process can occur if DCDD determines a Form, Fit, and Function or Packed Verification of the new set needs to be done.

e. Once we do get the approval letter back from DCDD, the USAMMA Assembly Management Division personnel has 30 days to identify sourcing for the set components before the new version is published as an approved set and the new set with new UAC is ready for a build.

How does the PM Units report any shortages from their MESs?

Ensure you accurately report shortages in your Unit Status Report (See AR 220-1 Chapter 5). Your higher headquarters up to FORSCOM and the Department of the Army need to know your equipment readiness. Your commander can subjectively downgrade your unit's readiness rating if he/she identifies a shortfall in clinical capability. Also, the Army mandates the use of the Army Equipment Common Operating Picture (ECOP), which is on the HQs Department of the Army SIPR site, to post MTOE shortages as well as Operational Needs Statements (ONSs).

Reportable LINs having several components, for example, sets, kits or outfits (SKO) and/or medical materiel equipment sets (MMS/MES/DES/DMS/VES), will be reported as on hand if property records show the LIN has been issued and at least 90 percent of each SKO nonexpendable and durable items are present and serviceable. Do not count the set as on hand, if more than 10 percent of the nonexpendable and/or durable components are unserviceable, missing, depleted, or require supply action under AR 735-5 (for example, a report of a survey).

ALL RC units will exclude all expendable and durable MMS/MES/DES/DMS/VES component items that have a shelf life less than 60 months (shelf life codes of A-H, J-M, P-R, or 1-9). AC, echelon III and IV medical units will exclude all expendable and durable items with a shelf life less than 60 months that are part of the Surgeon General's centralized contingency programs. The list of this materiel is available in SB 8-75-S7.

Medical Materiel Quality Control (MMQC) messages

How are Medical Materiel Quality Control (MMQC) messages generated? Where does the data come from?

- The normal means of receiving requests for messages are from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Product Manufacturers and/or Defense Medical Materiel Program Office (DMMPO)—formerly Defense Medical Standardization Board (DMSB). FDA sends "RECALLS" to Defense Logistics Agency, Troup Support (DLA-TS)--formerly Defense Supply Center of Philadelphia (DSCP).

- Other means of receiving requests for messages are: MEDWATCH, Institute of Safe Medical Practices (ISMP), other Pharmacists / healthcare providers, drug companies, CDC, World Wide Web, MILVAX, and customers.

- DLA-TS compiles all recall information and forwards it to USAMMA.

- USAMMA receives information, researches products for National Stock Numbers (NSN) and or National Drug Codes (NDC). USAMMA inputs recall information into MMQC system.

- USAMMA has subject matter experts that approve messages prior to releasing them (pharmacists, clinical staff, medical equipment maintenance staff).

- USAMMA releases messages to the USAMMA website and e-mails messages out to registered e-mail recipients.

Supply Catalogs and Bulletins

How do I order Supply Catalogs?

a. Medical Supply Catalogs are available on LOGSA's Logistics Information Warehouse (LIW) website, https://liw.logsa.army.mil). For users without access to LIW, reference their website and request access by completing a System Access Request (SAR). Since these SCs published reflect component requirements as of that date for all of our current sets, this initiative should provide a greater number of SCs and assist units with property book downloads. As this new method of publishing SCs has proven successful, USAMMA has stopped producing hard copy SCs ordered thru Army Publishing Directorate (APD), approximately 1 October 2009.

b. Requests for printed supply bulletins (SB 8-75 Series) cannot be filled from USAMMA. If your activity has a need for the SB 8-75 Series, you will need to go to the Army Publishing Directorate (APD) website (http://www.apd.army.mil). Hardcopy requests are no longer accepted through the DA Pam Series. You must have a valid account number and utilize the APD web site to order publications. Your requirements must be submitted through the following electronic method by accessing the APD web site: http://www.apd.army.mil. For further assistance in using the system or services, contact APD Customer Service, Media Distribution Division, at 314-592-0900, extension 4, or at DSN 892-0900, extension 4. If you need to check the status of your order or are having problems with pending orders, contact APD Customer Service personnel, Media Distribution Division, at the above telephone number.

c. You can access any of the Supply Bulletin 8-75 Series on this site.

Where can I find the Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide for MOS 68A?

The manual can be found on the Official Department of the Army Publications and Forms website or you can click here for the manual entitled STP 8-68A15-SM-TG, JANUARY 2011, SOLDIER'S MANUALAND TRAINER'S GUIDE FOR BIOMEDICAL EQUIPMENT SPECIALIST MOS 68A SKILL LEVELS, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 (AKO login required)

Vaccine Distribution

Who is my Immunization Healthcare Specialist (IHS)?

Your Immunization Healthcare Specialist is regionally assigned to provide expertise in all areas of vaccine program implementation. A map detailing contact information and areas of responsibility for each IHS can be found on the DHA Immunization Healthcare Branch website.

I have not been contacted in regards to vaccine I requested, who should I contact?

If you have received a confirmation email with an order ID number, contact USAMMA DOC. If you did not, then contact your service representative.

I have received my vaccine. What steps do I take?

Upon receipt of your package, contact the USAMMA Distribution Operations Center (DOC) immediately after inspecting the outside of the package for damage. Please call your designated case manager, the person who contacted you verbally and by email with tracking information. Your case manager will then walk you through the verbal release process for your vaccine.

I have just ordered vaccine. What are the responsibilities of the POC and alternate POC for my site?

POCs and other designated personnel must be familiar with the handling of TSMPs. At least two designated personnel will be on site the day of requested delivery. USAMMA DOC will contact designated personnel prior to shipment to verify all contact information and availability.

Who is my case manager?

Case managers are assigned to oversee a vaccine shipment and to work with you directly to ensure your vaccine is received, processed and stored properly to minimize the chance of a vaccine loss. Your case manager's contact information can be found on the Pre-Alert email sent to you on the day of vaccine shipment.

What do I do if I suspect that I’ve had a compromise in my vaccine?

Immediately quarantine vaccines in a proper storage facility. Contact your IHS immediately. Visit our DOC webpage for more directions.       

What do I do if I put my diluent in the refrigerator?

Immediately remove to a room temperature environment. Label "DO NOT USE" and contact USAMMA DOC for disposition.

How long is my Smallpox good for after reconstitution?

30 days.

I have vaccine that I am not going to use prior to expiration. What do I do?

Contact USAMMA DOC and/or your service representative.

What do I do if I suspect that I have inoculated personnel with expired vaccine?

Immediately cease inoculations and contact your local IHS representative.

What should I do when my AX27L stops working?

Contact USAMMA DOC and await determination on whether AX27L is serviceable and/or under a current contract. If so, USAMMA DOC will provide instructions for returning the AX27L for repairs. If not, USAMMA DOC will provide manufacture contact information so that your command may contact the manufacturer directly.

How do I request Cold Chain Management (CCM) training for my site?

Contact the USAMMA Distribution Operations Center (DOC) Project Manager at DSN 343-1197 or COMM 301-619-1197/301-676-0857, or the USAMMA Pharmacy Consultant/Military Vaccine Agency (MILVAX) Deputy Director, Distribution Operations at DSN 343-4307 or COMM 301-619-4307/301-256-8072.

What factors determine timeliness of delivery for Influenza vaccine?

There are numerous factors:

- Availability of vaccine.

- Award of contract to various manufacturer's; to include delivery dates and quantities.

- Delivery of Influenza vaccine to Defense Logistics Agency depots.

- Official policy guidance providing priorities for administering the Influenza vaccine.

Can I use last year's Influenza vaccine?

No. Influenza, commonly called "the flu" is caused by the influenza virus. Flu viruses change from year to year. A vaccine made against flu viruses circulating last year may not protect against the newer viruses. That is why the influenza vaccine is updated to include current viruses every year. Each flu season is unique.

When is Influenza season officially over?

The CDC recommends that people get vaccinated in October or November because flu activity in the United States generally peaks between late December and early March. You can still benefit from getting vaccinated after November, even if flu is present in your area. Vaccine should continue to be offered to unvaccinated people throughout the flu season as long as vaccine is still available.

Strategic Readiness

Where can I find more information about USAMMA's Centrally Managed Programs, such as APS and the Medical Materiel Readiness Program (MMRP)?

Visit our Centrally Managed Programs page.

What is USAMMA's role in Foreign Military Sales (medical)?

Visit our FMS page.

 
 
12/5/2017
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